The date is: 2016/05/04 01:54:05.



Using the iostat command to keep track of disk usage on Linux.

This example shows the iostat command printing information about disk usage on my Ubuntu system.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ iostat
Linux 4.6.0-rc1-jason (jason-desktop) 	01/05/16 	_x86_64_	(4 CPU)
 
avg-cpu:  %user   %nice %system %iowait  %steal   %idle
           2.50    0.43    1.28   24.37    0.00   71.42
 
Device:            tps    kB_read/s    kB_wrtn/s    kB_read    kB_wrtn
sda               1.49       147.22         0.00      64455          0
sdb               0.41        14.30         0.00       6260          0
sdc               0.51        19.06         0.00       8345          0
sdd               0.75        28.59         0.00      12516          0
scd0              0.04         0.17         0.00         76          0
sde             153.23      2141.39       783.14     937499     342860

The -c parameter prints the CPU usage chart.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ iostat -c
Linux 4.6.0-rc1-jason (jason-desktop) 	01/05/16 	_x86_64_	(4 CPU)
 
avg-cpu:  %user   %nice %system %iowait  %steal   %idle
           2.38    0.38    1.20   21.51    0.00   74.52

Use the -h parameter to display the hardware utilization chart in a human readable format.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ iostat -h
Linux 4.6.0-rc1-jason (jason-desktop) 	01/05/16 	_x86_64_	(4 CPU)
 
avg-cpu:  %user   %nice %system %iowait  %steal   %idle
           2.28    0.34    1.19   19.46    0.00   76.72
 
Device:            tps    kB_read/s    kB_wrtn/s    kB_read    kB_wrtn
sda
                  1.19       117.04         0.00      64455          0
sdb
                  0.33        11.37         0.00       6260          0
sdc
                  0.40        15.15         0.00       8345          0
sdd
                  0.60        22.73         0.00      12516          0
scd0
                  0.03         0.14         0.00         76          0
sde
                122.03      1702.43       629.65     937511     346744

The iostat command is available in the sysstat package for Debian and other distributions. Type sudo apt-get install sysstat to install this useful utility. A related command is vmstat. This will also print out useful system information.

vmstat example.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ vmstat 
procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- -system-- ------cpu-----
 r  b   swpd   free   buff  cache   si   so    bi    bo   in   cs us sy id wa st
 0  0      0 9868316 201264 1025412    0    0   411   139  270  992  3  1 79 17  0

Use the -d parameter in vmstat to print out disk usage information. Kernel version newer than 2.5.70 required.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ vmstat -d
disk- ------------reads------------ ------------writes----------- -----IO------
       total merged sectors      ms  total merged sectors      ms    cur    sec
ram0       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram1       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram2       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram3       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram4       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram5       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram6       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram7       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram8       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram9       0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram10      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram11      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram12      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram13      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram14      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
ram15      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop0      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop1      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop2      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop3      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop4      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop5      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop6      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
loop7      0      0       0       0      0      0       0       0      0      0
sda      653      0  128910    1224      0      0       0       0      0      0
sdb      181      0   12520     892      0      0       0       0      0      0
sdc      223      0   16690    1556      0      0       0       0      0      0
sdd      329      0   25032    3765      0      0       0       0      0      1
sr0       19      0     152     400      0      0       0       0      0      0
sde    62169   2174 1875086 1247335   5089  13350  695344  516993      0    241

The -p parameter will print out information about a partition. Kernel version newer than 2.5.70 required.

jason@jason-desktop:~$ vmstat -p /dev/sda1
sda1          reads   read sectors  writes    requested writes
                 563     124696          0          0

What do you think?

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