Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop. A preview of this new Mint interface.

This is a look at the 1.2 release of the Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop. The desktop may be configured as with Gnome Shell to look like the familiar Gnome 2 layout.

3 Comments

  • Posted February 24, 2012 at 11:08 PM | Permalink

    Thanks for your comment, I appreciate the feedback.

    • Super Jamie
      Posted February 29, 2012 at 11:18 PM | Permalink

      You’re talking to a spambot.

  • Posted March 2, 2012 at 7:47 AM | Permalink

    OK, I tried it.It looks a bit like an ugielr, more feature-poor version of a GNOME 2 desktop. I am not struck, as they say Oop North.I have also read that Fallback Mode, which is what this is, is not widely-used among the GNOME 3 devs and there is a possibility that it’ll be dropped in future revisions of GNOME 3.x. Frankly, if you want something lightweight and like unto GNOME 2, I think you’d be better off with Xubuntu than GNOME 3 in Fallback mode.Just sayin’.I honestly don’t get all the fuss over Unity. You are far from alone in your dislike, but I’ve yet to get a coherent picture of what it is that people are not getting on with.Is it a question of missing features that you need? Or is it behaviours that you particularly dislike? I’m just curious, but I’d like to understand. I’m a non-novice, having been an Ubuntu user since 4.10 and a Linux user since 1996, although I only moved my desktop to it part-time in 1997 or so when Caldera came out, complete with KDE 1, and full-time around 2001 or so with SUSE. And yet, I find Unity attractive, easy and convenient, and it doesn’t stop me doing anything I did with GNOME 2.

    I actively like the Launcher, which I find an elegant replacement for both panels, in my preferred position, viz., down the left hand side, economical with screen real-estate and excellent for widescreen displays. I don’t like the app browser much, but hey, I rarely use it; app launching via the Windows key and the first 2 or 3 letters of the app name is convenient. The multiple-workspace support is improved over GNOME 2, although I prefer GNOME 3 s flexible-number-of-workspaces-in-a-floating-sidebar approach. I’d like thumbnails in the icon, at least.I find it easy and convenient to run multiple apps and switch between them. I have tried various docks for Ubuntu, including Docky, AWM and ADeskBar. The Unity Launcher works better than any of them, even if it’s not as pretty and lacks the snazzy chrome . I hope that some of the 3rd-party dock devs offer some of their effects to the Launcher devs and that we end up with them all merged, or at least, feature-equivalent.

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